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Dhadamsstatecollegenorthadamsstatecollegenorthadamsstatecollegenorthadamsstatecollegenorthadamsstatecollegenorthadamsstatecolle^ 



. . . friends, 

You might ask why this book is titled, "changes". We answer that all life is full 
of changes from the passing of the seasons to the passing of people through their 
college years . 

Look around you. Change is everywhere. The college community has undergone 
many alterations and additions to change the character of the physical and 
academic environment. People, known or unknown to you as friends or strangers 
are constantly altering and varying their personalities and actions . 

Change implies something new and often excitingly different. It grows when 
monotony is overcome and fresh, novel and unprecedented ideas come to the 
surface. With this feeling in mind, we'd like to share our thoughts with you. As 
the seasons of the year, and the seasons of our lives come and go we wish for you 
the ability to live and grow with change, a fact of life. 

... The 1974 Yearbook Staff 



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"The Road Not Taken" 






Two roads diverged in a yellow wood, 
And sorry I could not travel both 
And be one traveler, long I stood 
And looked down one as far as I could 
To where it bent in the undergrowth; 

Then took the other, as just as fair, 
And perhaps the better claim, 
Because it was grassy and wanted wear; 
Though as for that, the passing there 
Had worn them really about the same, 

And both that morning equally lay 
In leaves no step had trodden black. 
Oh, I kept the first for another day! 
Yet knowing how way leads on to way, 
I doubted if I should ever come back. 

I shall be telling this with a sigh 
Somewhere ages and ages hence: 
Two roads diverged in a wood, and I — 
I took the one less traveled by, 
And that has made all the difference. 




From THE POETRY OF ROBERT FROST edited by Edward Connery Lathem. 
Copyright 1916, (c) 1969 by Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc. Copyright 1944 by 
Robert Frost. Reprinted by permission of Holt, Rinehart and Winston, Inc . 



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I 




James T. Amsler 
President 





Nancy W. Granger 
Dir. of Intramurals 

George H. Jarck 

Dean of Student Affairs 

Raymond Sullivan 

Dir. of Professional Affairs 

Catherine C. Chalifoux 
Resident Nurse 



Charles A. Mclssac 
Director — Library 

Suzanne W. Kemper 
Librarian 

Ann Terry berry 
Librarian 

Joan Zagata 
Librarian 



CO 

CO 

CO 
CO 

e 

CO 






Carl T. Hoynoski 
Bursar 

Thomas M. Jones 
Registrar 

Stephen M. Long, Jr. 
Dir. of Placement and 
Community 




Deborah Murphy 
Staff Assistant — Adm. 
and Fin. Aid 

Dr. James R. Roach 
Academic Counselor 

Janice Schwert 

Staff Assistant — Place- 
ment and Alumni Af- 
fairs 

Anthony L. Sinclitico 
Dir. of Facilities and Of- 
fice Services 









James F. Sulzman 
Academic Counselor 

William T. West 
Assistant Dir. of Admis- 
sions 

Mrs. Farmer 
Head of Residence 

Dennis M. and Linda 

Smith 
Heads of Residence 



Mrs. L. Lanoue 
Head of Residence 

John DiLeggo 
Head of Security 



SO 



Ho 



3 






John R. Brooks 

Virginia W. Davis 

William Mahoney 
Chairman 




Judith Waterman 




~r 




o 



o 



Dr. John M.C. Hess 

Paul M. Humora 
Medical Technology 

Dr. Duncan McKenzie 
Chairman 



Dr. Richard R. Mac- 
Mahon 

Dr. Michael Sabol 
Medical Technology 

Dr. Jerry Smosky 
Medical Technology— 
Co-ordinator 

Margaret Tkal 
Lab Assistant 



SO 



So 
CO 



rO 



tJ 



CO 
CO 



CO 





Dr. Donald F. Bowman 
Chairman 

William J. Coffey 

Mr. Giroux 



Elizabeth Kendall 
William C.Lawler 
A. Stanley Lefkowitz 



Peter Markou 
William Moriarty 
Ralph Nittinger 



Dr. Abdul Q. J. Shaikh 
James Snyder 
Richard A. Yach 



V 




Dr. John L. Conklin 

Maurine E. Horsman 

Isobel R. King 
Dir. Early Childhood 
Education 




Louise Mulligan 
Dr. Helen Neel 
Chester C.Stark 
Margaret M. Toole 







Dr. Vida Ann Vliet 

Lea Vozar 

Dr. Donald E. Washburn 
Chairman 

Robert R. Wheeler 





§• 

tie 
o 




H. Lee Combs 
Chairman 

Eugene Melville 



CO 






O 

e 

O 
ho 



11 








V. 




Clark Billings 
James. B. Canning 
Daniel P. Connerton 





Dr. Mary M. Fuqua 
Acting Chairman 

Dr. W. Anthony 
Gengarelly 

Dr. Randall G. Hansis 
Chairman 



12 




b 





Thomas H. McClure 
JohnT.McNulty 
Dr. George W. Neel 



o 

• fo 

HO 



So 




I 






Dr. Leonard E. Adelson 
Dr. Melvin B%nd 
Arthur W. Eade 
George F. Gloster 








Howard Hochman 

Joseph Jordan 

Dr. Wilhelm Kempf 

Dr. Edmund Staples 
Chairman 







CO 



o 




Anthony DiNinno 

Dr. Anthony Nicastro 
Chairman 





Stephanie Orringer 
Ellen Schiff 



13 



C 

CO 

3 




Louis S. Cuccinello 
Chairman 

Dwight Killam 

JaneLePage 

Cheryl Niederman 
Dance Instructor 




[ r 




CO 

o 










Dr. Ali M. Allmaker 

Dr. Philip E. Divine 

Dr. Marc A. Goldstein 

Dr. Samuel Gomez 
Chairman 



o 
• ^ 

-to 



o 

CO 




Thomas Baker 

Susan D. Getchell 

Thomas H. Greene 
Chairman 




Patricia Mowbray 

Joseph Zavattaro Jr. 
Director of Athletics 



CO 
CO 

a. 







Dr. Jurn Sun Leung 

Dr. Donald Rexford 

Dr. WUliam G. Seeley 
Chairman 




Martin S. Weinhous 
Dr. Carl A. Wolf 



o 



co 



15 










Dr. William Anderson 
Dr. Samuel Clarke 
Dr. Robert V. D'Angelo 



16 




V^C 




Marvin Denzel, Jr. 
Lab Assistant 

Dr. Robert V. Hamilton 
Chairman 

Richard Hatch 

Dr. James Schoen 



S2 

o 



& 

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HO 

St 
O 

St 

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o 
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Stephen A. Green 

RuthS. Innes 

Dr. Charles Mark 
Chairman 




Dr. Leonard F. Paolillo 
Dr. Thomas Price 



Not photographed: 
Frederick, K. Bressette 
William R. Minardi 
Arnold Prince 
Andre J. Senecal 
Fred Johns 



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/ HAVE TAUGHT THEM ALL 










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* 



I have taught School for ten years. During that time, I have given 
assignments, among others, to a thief, a murderer, an evangelist, a 
pugilist and an imbecile. The murderer was a quiet little boy who 
sat in the first row and regarded me with pale blue eyes; the 
evangelist, easily the most popular boy in school, had the lead in 
the Junior Play; the pugilist lounged by the window and let loose 
at intervals a raucous laugh that startled even the geraniums; the 
thief was a gay hearted Lothario with a song on his lips; and the 
imbecile was a soft hearted little animal seeking the shadows. 

The murderer awaits death in the state penitentiary; the 
evangelist has lain a year now in the churchyard; the pugilist lost 
an eye in Hong Kong; the thief, by standing on tip-toe can see the 
windows of my room from the county jail; and the quiet eyed little 
moron beats his head against the wall in a state asylum. 

All these pupils have sat in my room, sat and looked at me gravely 
across worn desks. I must have been a great help to these pupils — 
I taught them the rhyming scheme of the Elizabethan sonnet and 
how to diagram a complex sentence. 



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19 



You can wander hour after hour from building 
to building, upstairs, through tunnels, get off an 
elevator, drive endlessly searching for a parking 
space but still as you look around yourself, don't 
you ever wonder 




Why? 




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. . . People. 

Isn't that what it's all 

about? 




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Here we live 
together as 

Students, 





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Sports 
enthusiasts, 
















and 

friends . . . 



32 




underclassmen spend 
time studying, 
conversing, thinking 
and wandering . . . 







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through their 
college years. 





36 




the parking dilemma. 




that no one 
seems to be 
able to deal 
with! 



with the 
coming of 
winter 



comes 




just another . 
one of those 
shrugged off 
overlooked, 
unsolved problems 




37 







. . . was it spring 1973? 







. . . was it fall 1973? 




north 
adams 

state 
college 

campus 
center 



. was it spring 1974? 




The North Adams State College Campus Center will bring a dimension to our campus not avail- 
able at any other Massachusetts State College Campus . 
The many diverse and exciting programs to be offered will range from craftwork, photography 
darkroom work, swimming and billiards to gymnasium activities, squash, handball, television view- 
ing and reading in the fireplace lounge. 
Also available within the Center will be many club meeting rooms, WJJW will be in operation on 
the 3rd floor, and an entire dance complex will enhance that particular program . 
Without a doubt, this will truly represent a "living and learning" center for North Adams 

Students. 




39 



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it seems 



interesting that 
we can spend so 
much time in one place 
and still know so 
little about it. 
did you ever stop 



to think 
what else we 
might be 
missing? 





40 




can you recognize 
these familiar 
places on campus? 



41 



the only 

sidewalks that 

aren't rolled up 

at night . . . 




HBOWOOO 
VIOTEL 




42 



our swinging 
night life? 





good friends, 
good times 
good 



memories 



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who 
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"Day by Day . . . 
Oh dear Lord three 
things I pray. To 
see thee more clear- 
ly, follow thee more 
nearly, love thee 
more dearly, day by 
day." 






"You'd better 
think twice 
about leaving 
me behind. 
Make up your 
mind, about 
what you're 
going to do." 







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'Thanks for all 
you've done, it 
may sound hol- 
low. Thank you 
for the good 
times that we've 
known, but I 
must find my 
own road now to 
follow. You will 
all be welcome in 
my home." 




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wmm. 





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motets 




54 



chaunticleer 



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college chorale 



55 








56 



beta 




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college fraternity — men joined together by bonds of 
understanding and meaningful friendships with common 
ideas and goals striving for the true meaning of brother- 
hood and fellowship. 



57 




58 




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59 







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61 




all those extra activities that 




63 




help make it all worthwhile 




64 









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66 









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"mudfest 



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NO TRESPASSING 

GEO. E. EMERSON,^ 



AS 
PER 




76 













mm 



77 



one less 
bridge to 
cross. 

one less 
goal to 
pursue. 

one more 
step behind 
us. 





Four isolated years, — 
unique years that can never be 
relived. In an introduction to 
Freshmen and transfers one 
year, President James T. Am- 
sler expressed this feeling, 
"You have come to college as 
one kind of person. I would 
hope you will leave as a differ- 
ent and better person; one who 
is quite able to cope with your- 
self, with other people and 
with the world around you." 

Perhaps it is one more expe- 
rience behind us but forget 
not experiences and people we 
have yet before us. In the 
words of Oscar Wilde, "Educa- 
tion is an admirable thing, but 
it is well to remember from 
time to time that nothing that 
is worth knowing can be 
taught." 




*». 



•i*J 



college is... 




Gail Adams 
Jean Alford 



Pat Allen 
Jim Allison 



Marie Angeli 
Donna Antaramian 



Cindy Babcock 
Rose Baczewski 



Mike Bammarito 
Deborah Bates 



Donna Beane 
Lynn Belliveau 



82 



. . . dropping your soap in the shower and having a girl 
pick it up for you. 

. . . frustrating. 

. . . trying to fall out of bed for a class. 

. collective confusion. 




Jeanne Bernard 


Michael Bourdon 


Eliot Bryan 


Janet Calcagni 


David Cary 


Deborah Cilli 


Chris Bloyder 


Cynthis Bracht 


Bonnie Bump 


Barbara Canale 


Charles Chacona 


Glen Clairmont 


Ben Bolt 


Richard Brown 


Alan Bush 


Anita Card 




Cheryl Collins 



83 



three hour liiuv 

. . . Noise when you w ^nt quiet, and quiet when you feel 
like being loud. 

. . . parties, parties, partit" — loneliness. 




Janet Craig 


Robert Derderian 


Dan Dombek 


Patricia Driscoll 


Kathy El ef ante 


Edward Fan- 


Deborah Danielson 


Jerry Desmaris 


Judith Dougherty 


Colleen Dupont 


John Elias 


Anita Ferrari 


Karen Degere 


Karen DeSteuben 


Sally Webster Douglas 


Nancy Duston 


Patricia Fahey 


LouAnne Fiamingo 


Sharon DeMyer 


Mary DiLorenzo 


Edward Dowgiewicz 


Wayne Duval 




Maryann Figoni 



84 



. living for a week on your last quarter. 
. pulling an all-nighter and falling asleep during the exam. 




Michael Flanagan 


John Giansante 


Chris Gosselin 


Patricia Hall 


Ann Haviland 


Matthew Holmes 


Jennifer Fleming 


Debbie Gillette 


John Grady 


Sandy Harrington 


Kathy Heaps 


Bev Holtsberg 


Rosemary Gallagher 


Sue Gilman 


Diane Flister Grady 


Sue Harrington 


Neil Hirons 


Jeff Horton 


Tom Gecewicz 


Kathy Gleeson 


Arnold F. Guy Jr. 


Mike Hastings 


Pat Hoffman 


Ken Howcroft 


Sandy Gianetti 


David Gomez 


Linda Gwozdz 


Kathy Haughton 


Ellen Holland 


Carol Hughes 



85 



long Sunday nights and tough Monday mornings. 

getting carded at the packie and discovering that you left your ID in your room. 




Betsy Hurton 
Nancy Jakacky 
Pat Hussar 
Susan Ivancic 
Carrie Jenkins 



Mary Ellen Joyce 
Paula Kamataris 
Jean Kasianchuk 
Ray Kavey 
Denise Kelley 



Margaret Kelley 
Kathy Kennedy 
David Kenyon 
Mary Kiely 



Candace Kochin 
James Koehler 
Ellen Kolis 
Edith Koza 
Judith Koza 



Martha Krason 
Margaret Kuhn 
Marilyn Kunes 
Anthony Kwajewski 
Allyn LaFleur 



Paul Lally Jr. 
Jane Lalor 
Jack Lapseritis 
Brian Lauzon 



86 



. . . waiting forever for Friday night, and the next thing 
you know it's Monday. 

. . . trying to inhale your lunch between 12:30 and your 1:00 class. 




^M 



Gary LeCuyer 


Ann Losapio 


Chris Matthews 


Chris Mcintosh 


Ellen Minns 


Jean Morton 


Christine Lemanski 


Peggy Loughlin 


Mary Mazzu 


Arlene McNamara 


Carol Mirante 


Pam Moynagh 


Marcia Lewis 


Elizabeth Maloney 


Marcia McCann 


Clifton Melatti 


Pamela Montini 


Evelyn Mullen 


Cynthia Lipski 


Alan Marquis 


Peter Mc Govern 


James Meikle 


Hank Moriarty 


Joe Muraca 


Bill Longstreet 


Patricia Martin 




Alice Mele 


Margaret Morrison 





87 



. . . dragging yourself out of bed for an 8:00 class after a 
bad night and having the prof, fail to show up. 

finding out parietals have been taken away when your date is coming up for the weekend. 




Thomas Murray 


Anna O'Brien 


Virginia Paciorek 


Estelle M. Phelps 


Ann Polo 


Debbie Rappoli 


Camille Mussi 


Carol Ogonowski 


Vickie Passier 


Joe Pio 


Carolyn Pomerleau 


James Reed 


Paul Nash 


Rae Olander 


Kathy Pennace 


Michelle Plantier 


Angela Poulimenos 


Susan Reiker 


Pam Noble 


Kathy Olsjewski 


Linda Pennace 


Robert Pleau 


Priscilla Prest 


Kathy Rice 


Judy Nosek 


Charles Oranellas 


Mary Peronto 


Keith Polansky 


Barbara Puppel 


Anne Robertson 



88 



finding out that Tuesday is Monday's schedule and 
you haven't done your paper yet. 

hearing the fire alarm in the middle of a shower. 

getting back to the dorm at 12:01 and finding the 
door locked until 1:00 AM. 




Fran Rogers Jr. 
Susan Rondeau 
William Rosendale 
Carol Rytuba 



Patricia Sacco 
Pat Salem 
Nanda Salvitti 
Chris Santille 



Lois Satko 
Nancy Lepage Sefcik 
Jill Senecal 
Silvia Shaw 



Michael Shea 
John Shellnutt 
Tom Shugrue 
Paul Sikora 



Rosemary Simcox 
Barbara Sims 
Al Skrocki 



Dolores Slowik 
Frances Smith 
Mitch Smith 
Phil Smith 



89 



. . . climbing to the third floor of Murdock Hall at 8:00 AM 
and finding the class has been moved to Bowman Hall. 

. being one of 36 people needing the same book on Reserve 
tonight that's due tomorrow. 

. . . looking down at your salad and finding a little green 
face with feelers looking up at you. 

. . being scared half out of your mind when someone tries 
to break into your bedroom window at 3:00 AM. 




Richard Stickney 


Gail Sullivan 


Irene Susco 


Richard Taylor 


Dave Tomasini 


Barbara Vivian 


Andy Sullivan 


Ruth Ann Sullivan 


Ray Sylvain 


Peggy Thorton 


Sue Urquhart 


Linda Voutilla 


Danny Sullivan 


Tim Sullivan 


James Taylor 




Raymond Vallieres 


Don Warfield 



90 



a four year escape from society. 




Maggi Wells Debbie Wentworth Myra White 

Timothy J. Wells Margie McNamara Wheelock Stephen White 



Christine Wilk 



Patricia Wilk 
Marylou Willette 



Sharon Wondoloski 
Louise Zocchi 



91 




time and tide wait 



■■ 




for no man. 



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•••••• <••••• 

•••••• ■••••• 

•••••• ■••••• 

•••••• ••••• 

•••••• ■••••• 

•••••• ■••••• 

•••••• •••••• 

•••••• •••••• 

•••••• •••••• 

•••••• •••••• 

•••••• •••••• 

•••••• •••••• 

III'.'. To spend four years in a higher echelon of learning with the purpose of preparing oneself to :\\Ht 

XI'.'.'- fit into a mold of society, may seem like such a large portion of a person's life to be devoted to '.'.'.11* 

•••*'- school. But a carpenter would not think of building a house without first starting a founda- •••••• 

III'.', tion and learn precisely how to build that foundation. Academic foundations are years of fun, ;;;;•• 

Zll'.'- tedium, frustration, reward, and social change. These are years of exploring, experimenting '.'.'.lit 

••••;■ with one's personality, challenging the intellect, and most important of all learning about ;•••• 

III'.'., ourselves. ::::*J 

•••••• ■••••• 

•••••• •••••• 

••'.'.'■ Between exams, perhaps over a beer, or sitting under a maple tree on campus one sunny ;;•••• 

till' day, people might be pondering in their minds: where do each and everyone of us fit in ... in '.'.lilt 

III'.', this increasingly congested and ever changing world? Can our minds comprehend what is ''.'.lit 

mill', ''really " out there waiting for us? Should we view the realities of life with optimism? Sure, our ;;;•• 

*•*:: sojourn through life is enigmatic with pernicious overtones of population explosion, atomic '.'.III* 

mil'.', war, pollution, depleting of the earth's natural resources, the list is endless, and all of this is '••••• 

Zll'.'. an evolutionary by-product of change. Can we call this type of change "modern progress"? • •;• *• 

••••• •••••• 

•••••• •••••• 

till' We are microcosms within ourselves, a mere speck of dust on this planet; is it justly feasi- ;•••• 

•••... bi e as individuals to devote our lives and energy crusading in the name of humanity, arguing '.'.IHZ 

till'.', against world politicians on what is right and what is wrong?! We can, indeed work and grow '.'.III 

till''- from the more unabsurd factions of our society, from the foundation that we developed and •••••• 

Zll'.'. laid for ourselves over the past four years, years that will make us a vital part of the Twen- '.'.lilt 

till'- tieth Century. Our influence will be discreet, though unabashed. We don't have to be promi- ''.lilt 

•III' nent national heroes like Ralph Nader and others. We can participate also! Us "little guys" ;•;;•• 

till'- can De activated too! Yes, we can affect change. It takes a positive approach to things; it '.'.lilt 

till'-'- takes a reserve of psychic and physical energy; and it takes wanting to live a better life, ac- '■'•lilt 

••••; cepting our neighbor's idiosyncrasies whether they live next door or in another country. We ;;;;jj 

Zll'.'- cannot afford to reject his "funny" cultural ways; we cannot afford to paste labels on people '.'.lilt 

till''- because we feel our skin color is more appealing than theirs; also we cannot afford to let the -•••• 

#•••• •••••0 

III'.', governmental system of this country be a parent to us, for it would be an injustice to our- ::;;•• 

••!•*.'. selves and a mockery to democracy . . . this nation's true foundation . '.'.lilt 

•••••• •••••• 

••••• ■••••• 

till'.: Let us merge with the times, though not allowing change to dictate to us. Instead, let us all ;;•£• 

till'- grow simultaneously facing the traumas and realities that encompass the nations of the '.'.lilt 

till- world, that we may not be defeated by change but fuse with and meticulously shape change : ««"»« 

till'.', without sifting-out the love and humanism that we as social animals through time have al- ;:•;•• 

III: ways learned humbly to share. '.'.lilt 

••••■ •••••• 

#•••• •••••• 

•••••• •••••• 

till'.- JackLapseritis .'.lilt 

•••••• •••••• 

•••.. •••••• 

*•*.. •••••• 

•••.- •••••• 

•••••• •••••• 

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#•••• •••••• 

•••.- -••••• 

•••.- •••••• 

••••• •••••• 

•••. •••••• 

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••••• •:;••• 

.••.•'.. •••*%••• 

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Where do you start on a letter that carries with it so many mixed feelings and experiences? 

First of all, it's especially important to me to thank my friends who were especially helpful in of- 
fering support, getting this book out and making it something our staff is really proud of. Special 
thanks to Jane Lalor and Ray Kavey whose time, hard work and understanding was so essential to 
the completion of our book. Two special people, Don Lendry and Al Thurston certainly deserve my 
special thanks. Our staff had some good times working together and to them also, I am especially 
grateful. 

As the book has progressed we've come to see how appropriate our title, "changes" really is for 
our situation. In these final stages of the book we can look back on all the alterations, additions, 
deletions and variations in the format and total mood of the book. From optimistic enthusiasm for a 
plan of 208 pages begun last Spring to the major cuts and rise of pessimistic feeling we are confront- 
ing now we've learned a lot from experience. 

Perhaps it is true that many college students aren't interested in yearbooks now but as a staff we 
refused to abandon our project. We believed in and do believe in it and certainly hope that some 
people refuse to believe that change has inevitably brought about the end of college yearbooks. 



Anita Card (Editor) 

Pat Hoffman (Assistant Editor) 

Ray Kavey (Photography Editor) 

Pat Hussar photographers 

Jeff Horton 

Jane Lalor (Section Editor) 

Donna Antaramian (Business Editor) 

Pam DeSantis 

Judy Dougherty 

Kathy Gleeson 

Susan Harrington 

Betsy Hurton 

Martha Krason 

Marcia Lewis 

Cindy Lipski 

Marcia McCann 

Priscilla Prest 

Fran Rogers 

Pat Salem 

Barbara Vivian 

Tim Wells 



95 



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